Learner Guide

BSBHRM506 MANAGE RECRUITMENT SELECTION
AND INDUCTION PROCESSES
LEARNER GUIDE

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CONTENTS
1. DEVELOP RECRUITMENT, SELECTION AND INDUCTION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
1.1 – Analyse strategic and operational plans and policies to identify relevant policies and
objectives ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
1.2 – Develop recruitment, selection and induction policies and procedures and supporting
documents……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
1.3 – Review options for technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness of recruitment
and selection process………………………………………………………………………………………………13
1.4 – Obtain support for policies and procedures from senior managers ………………………….14
1.6 – Communicate policies and procedures to relevant staff and provide training if required14
1.5 – Trial forms and documents supporting policies and procedures and make necessary
adjustments……………………………………………………………………………………………………………16
2. RECRUIT AND SELECT STAFF……………………………………………………………………………….21
2.1 – Determine future human resource needs in collaboration with relevant managers and
sections…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………22
2.2 – Ensure current position descriptors and person specifications for vacancies are used by
managers and others involved in recruitment, selection and induction processes ……………..23
2.3 – Provide access to training and other forms of support to all persons involved in
recruitment and selection process ……………………………………………………………………………..25
2.4 – Ensure advertising of vacant positions complies with organisational policy and legal
requirements ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….26
2.5 – Utilise specialists where necessary…………………………………………………………………….27
2.6 – Ensure selection procedures are in accordance with organisational policy and legal
requirements ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….28
2.7 – Ensure processes for advising applicants of selection outcome are followed…………….33
2.8 – Ensure job offers and contracts of employment are executed promptly, and new
appointments are provided with advice about salary, terms and conditions ………………………34
3. MANAGE STAFF INDUCTION………………………………………………………………………………….36

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3.1 – Provide access to training and ongoing support for all persons engaged in staff
induction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..36
3.2 – Check induction processes are followed across the organisation…………………………….37
3.3 – Oversee management of probationary employees and provide them with feedback until
their employment is confirmed or terminated ……………………………………………………………….39
3.4 – Obtain feedback from participants and relevant managers on extent induction process is
meeting its objectives ………………………………………………………………………………………………39
3.5 – Make refinements to induction policies and procedures…………………………………………41
REFERENCES ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….43

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1. DEVELOP RECRUITMENT, SELECTION AND INDUCTION POLICIES
AND PROCEDURES
1.1. Analyse strategic and operational plans and policies to identify relevant policies and
objectives
1.2. Develop recruitment, selection and induction policies and procedures and supporting
documents
1.3. Review options for technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness of recruitment and
selection process
1.4. Obtain support for policies and procedures from senior managers
1.5. Trial forms and documents supporting policies and procedures and make necessary
adjustments
1.6. Communicate policies and procedures to relevant staff and provide training if required
1.1 – Analyse strategic and operational plans and policies to identify relevant
policies and objectives
Introduction
One of the critical roles of the Human Resources (HR) profession is the introduction and nurture
of people within an organisation; recruitment, selection and induction are therefore important
processes when it comes to matching a potential worker to an organisation. These three
functions ensure that there is a sustainable and enduring relationship between the parties who
work together within the HR specialisation. If this is successful, then they are usually taken for
granted, but if they go wrong they can be remembered for a long period of time; some
organisations still have internal stories about recruitment disasters!
Industrial relations cover the workers in the industry and their relationship with the management
in the industry. Industrial relations may include a regulatory body to resolve industrial disputes,
collective bargaining, the role of management, unions and the government, legislation, a

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workers’ grievance redressal system, disciplinary policy and practice and industrial relations
training.
Organisational direction
The first HR question is about the actual need to recruit in the first place. Before making the
decision to recruit, many organisations now need the justification of the business case, not
simply the request for a replacement because someone has departed. There are other options
than the automatic ‘knee jerk’ reaction to get a replacement for the person who has left. Some
organisations formalise this process so that it is essential to make the business case and have it
signed off by a more senior person. The logic makes sense; by using the tool of restructure it
may be possible to convert two jobs into one. This would involve getting rid of some redundant
activities within both positions.
Workforce planning comes into play at this point in the thinking process. What is the company’s
workforce plan? What are the future needs of the organisation over the next ten years? Will
technological changes result in changes to the workforce? How will we plan for these changes?
If there are changes then will our existing workers be able to meet the new levels of skills?
Would extra training solve this problem or do we need a new type of worker?
In workforce planning there is a need to link the recruitment process to the strategic plan and
the business plan of the organisation; both of these plans outline the intended direction of the
organisation. With these generic objectives available, it becomes possible to plan the profile of
the people who will be sought to join the organisation. So, in this strategic context, the process
of recruitment is aligned to the company and its future directions. Obviously, the HR
professional needs to anticipate and forecast future needs. Some recruitment may involve the
selection of people because of their future development potential, not simply their current skills.
Case Study: The mechanic leaves
Irestore is a vehicle repair company. It handles the whole process of collecting the damaged
vehicle, giving a quote, making insurance arrangements, repairing and then painting the
damaged vehicle. Irestore is family business that is owned by a husband and wife and is in its
second generation of ownership, having been established for 40 years. Today, it employs 20
staff, many of whom have been with the company for 20 years; Irestore therefore has an aging
workforce. One employee, Alan, has decided to move on. He is 45 and he wants to move out of

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the city and into the country with his family. The country option is attractive, as several garages
and small repairers want his combination of practical and paint skills. Alan has an unusual set of
skills and he will be hard to replace with one person. Celine and Jeff, the owners of the
company, sit down and talk about the replacement issue.
They actually employ a HR consultant to facilitate their discussions; this allows them the
freedom to toss around ideas while the consultant can carefully listen from a specialist
perspective. As they discuss the various issues, Celine and Jeff start to think about the next
generation of ownership. They do not have any children who will be interested in this field of
work; their kids have both indicated a desire to work in different fields, like teaching and
information technology. After a brainstorming session, the owners decide that they need to
replace Alan with someone who has specialist qualifications in painting and detailing and this
person also needs to show some management potential, as they may even become a future
owner of the business, so the idea of an employee share scheme is a possible remuneration
option.
The resignation of Alan has created a turning point for this family business; the organisation
may not continue in the structure that it started with 40 years ago. Celine and Jeff decide to
recruit for a person with an engineering design degree. In this way, technical thinking skills
would be combined with a creative inclination. From the outset they wanted to test for
management interest and potential. They contacted their local university engineering faculty and
they met a range of new graduates. Shalini was a clear option. She was a migrant from Turkey
where her family had been involved in automotive engineering. She was keen about the idea of
taking over the business at some time in the future. She wanted to have children at some stage
and she would need parental leave but she was keen to work part-time during these periods.
Celine and Jeff were happy. Of course, she would cost more initially, but she was more than just
another recruit. Shalini was a potential solution to the business’s succession plan.
Learning points
This case study shows how the recruitment process may start as a simple replacement issue
and change into an organisational development and planning issue. The resignation of Alan was
more than just the departure of an employee; it was a turning point for the owners. They had a
window of opportunity to look ahead at the operations and the potential of the company. They
used an outsider, the HR consultant, to help them explore a range of options. They chose a

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higher level skill set in the planning for the new position. A new level of competence
(knowledge/skills/personal attributes) was required. The academic level of a graduate was an
important shift in skill levels. It is important to note how the parties were flexible about the issue
of parental leave. Given the aging population in Australia, there is a need for employers to think
about the shortage of future workers.
1.2 – Develop recruitment, selection and induction policies and procedures and
supporting documents
Develop policies
The recruitment process within an organisation is subject to policies and procedures in line with
the organisation’s current and future direction. The organisation will need to know how the direct
and indirect costs are justified in terms of the rate of return. Cost management is an essential
part of HR responsibility. General Managers will often seek the advice of the HR team when it
comes to making new appointments and replacements. Should we recruit for the same level, or
a higher or lower level? Often the question will be measured against the provisions of the
budget; what are the implications of the decision?
Recruitment policies
In modern HR practice there is an emphasis on making recruitment decisions within an overarching policy framework; this minimises the surprise that comes with a resignation, illness or a
death. In a policy framework, it is reasonable to expect to see the organisational processes and
procedures that a manager should follow.
Recruitment procedure
The recruitment procedure will vary from organisation to organisation, but, as mentioned above,
will be constructed under an overarching policy framework, in line with company values and
priorities. An example procedure is as follows:
1. Identify need for new recruit
2. Justify budget
3. Justify new recruit
4. Evaluate business

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5. Pass decision to Organisational Development person/team
6. Manager approves recruitment within the given parameters (such as budget).
This process ensures that the organisational issues are considered before recruitment
proceeds. It should be noted that the Organisational Development committee does not just
review recruitment proposals. Instead, it is involved in long term decisions about workforce
planning. This approach ensures that future thinking is linked to current decisions. It is also an
important learning and communication process for the operational manager and the members of
the OD committee. In everyday working situations these two sets of internal stakeholders may
not have opportunities to meet and communicate.
Sample macro policy framework
Engineering Professionals is a design and engineering solutions company. It operates in Perth,
Sydney and Melbourne. It employs 150 people, 70% of whom are engineers. The company
experiences a turnover rate of about 15% among the engineers as many head overseas to gain
additional experience. The following recruitment policy framework applies to the company.
Recruitment policy
General principle:
Recruitment is an important organisational process for EP. The company recognises that
turnover occurs and is healthy in most circumstances, especially where staff members move on
to gain additional and overseas experience. Recruitment is a process of opportunity, renewal
and development for the company. Therefore all recruitment offers must be first submitted for
approval by the Organisational Development committee. The committee can respond rapidly
through e-mail and teleconference technologies. The company undertakes to have decisions
made within five working days. In situations of absolute urgency then the HR Manager should
be consulted who, in turn, can get the approval of the CEO.
Exceptional situations
The company recognises that exceptional circumstances may occur. In these situations an
alternative approval pathway has been created through the HR Manager to the CEO.
Future directions
Change will occur over time. Staff members are encouraged to put new ideas to the OD
committee as part of the innovation and continuous improvement policies of the company.
The above is a policy framework. It outlines macro policy within the company. It does not deal
with the operational policies actually involved in the recruitment process. They are another level
down in the process as outlined in the following diagram.
Operational policies
See diagram below:

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Policy hierarchy for recruitment
The next tier down from macro policies relates to operating or implementation policies. Once the
approval for the position has been given then the manager can proceed to recruit. One of the
obvious decisions is whether recruitment should be internal or external. Opinions are divided on
this issue. Much depends upon the values system of the decision-maker.
Internal vs. external recruitment
Case Study: Chief Operating Officer
New Care is a successful human services agency, with national operations across three states
of Australia. New Care provides services to children, disabled people and the aged. New Care
has been in the process of restructure over the past 18 months under the control of the CEO.
During this time the Quality and Risk Manager has been on sick leave. His condition has varied

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over time. He has diabetes and needs to retire. On medical advice he does so after a six month
absence.
The CEO and the Board of Directors decide that this is an opportunity to make some changes.
They want to link the Quality Management role with an overall procedures role that may
incorporate being the deputy CEO. The new role has been described as the Chief Operating
Officer [COO]. This is an over-arching position that ensures all systems fit together and are
monitored through a single monitoring process. During the absence of the sick QR Manager, the
head of community operations acted in the role. She did a good job and she was complimented
by others on how well she integrated the five different service areas.
The CEO had a discussion with the Board about the new position and how it should be
advertised. Several board members talked about external advertising so they could look at a
selection of applications from the open marketplace. A couple also said this complied with the
principle of fairness in the New Care charter of values. The CEO decided to discuss the
situation with the person who had acted in the temporary replacement role. Her reaction was
cold. She asked whether the Board had considered the signals that would be sent by following
the external recruitment process. She outlined that it was firstly an ambiguous signal about her
performance in the acting role with all the responsibility but none of the power to make changes.
It was also a signal to internal staff that internal promotion was not really valid, even though HR
policies said this was a preferred process when there was a suitable candidate.
Her third point was that she might decide now is the time to leave and this would suddenly result
in the loss of experience and wisdom over two positions, including the transition from Quality to
Operations. The CEO thought about the situation. She did not want to lose internal talent with
relevant past experience especially when there was no guarantee that the external process
would yield a suitable candidate. The CEO discussed the issue again with the Board. They
agreed. The position was advertised internally. There was only one internal candidate for the
role.
Learning Points
This case-study raises the validity of the external advertisement process. While the Board
raised the general principle of fairness, they had not empathised with the views and culture of
existing staff and the signals an external advertisement would send. The Board showed a naïve
and common attitude: there is always someone better outside. This example would not leave
the appointee with a deep sense of trust in the Board, and that reaction would be natural in the

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circumstances. This example also shows the need to coach Board members to think about what
signals they may be sending, albeit inadvertently.
Recruitment and Selection Methods
Peer assessment
This method involves the involvement of a range of people with different relationships to
the candidate in inquiry about response and behaviour suitable for a particular work
situation or role.
Telephone and video interviews
Assessment of candidates via telephone and video calls is often applicable in cases
where the position is likely to attract candidates beyond national borders or in distant
areas. It is often used to conduct initial discussions so as to make preliminary
assessment of a candidate’s suitability probably before they make an appearance in
person.
Structured interviews
Structured Interviews involves the assessment of skills, attributes and behaviour through
inquiry based on behaviour. Interviews are useful in the assessment of a candidate’s
presentation and communication skills, as well as getting to know them and assessing
their cultural and social fit to the work area and job specifications.
Informal meetings
Less formal opportunities for meeting and interacting with candidates and structured
reference checking enhances the acquisition of further insight into behaviour and
performance of a candidate.
Work simulation exercises
This method involves individual candidates or groups taking part in exercises that they
would be required to undertake as part of the position. This method is effective in
predicting future behaviour.

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1.3 – Review options for technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness of
recruitment and selection process
Recruitment technology
There is a wide variety of technology available to aid and implement the recruitment process.
Opportunities are often posted and found online, which is hugely convenient and effective in the
modern world, as it allows 24 hour access from anywhere in the world.
Advertising a role
Advertising a role internally can be done with technology through:
Internal email, which can be sent to everyone or specific people
Company website or intranet, which can be accessed by staff
Screens and displays in the workplace.
Advertising a role externally can be done with technology through:
Websites:
o Company website
o Recruitment websites
o Social media
Radio
Television.
Recruitment
With digital advertising, applicants can apply through electronic means, such as:
Emailing CVs
Online application form
Telephone
Teleconference
Email.

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Selection
Technology can be used to initiate the selection process, eliminating and recommending
applicants before a human even sees the information. Examples of this are:
Online application forms: where specific attributes or qualifications are
required, application forms can discard applicants who do not possess the
required skills, etc. These forms can also categorise and prioritise those who
have the best qualifications / experience / skills, etc.
Psychometric testing: applicants who score highly in electronic psychometric
testing can be recommended, whilst those who score poorly can be disqualified
or placed at the lower end of the results.
Telephone interviews: telephone interviews can be used to create a shortlist of
potentially suitable applicants who can progress to the next stage of the
recruitment process, such as a face-to-face interview. Telephone interviews can
be conducted over the phone, via teleconference or through programs such as
Skype.
1.4 – Obtain support for policies and procedures from senior managers
1.6 – Communicate policies and procedures to relevant staff and provide training
if required
Work with managers
When policies and procedures are identified and established, they need to be adhered to by
everyone involved in the appropriate process(es).
Policies and procedure
Recruitment is targeted at competencies; organisations generally have a policy of recruiting
based upon the candidates’ abilities and potential. In our definition, which is a very common
definition, competency is explained as the integrated combination of knowledge, skills and
personal attributes.

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Core components of generic competency
In turn these components can be broken down into more detailed descriptions. A model of these
components has been depicted below.
The generic KSA competency model
Organisations also have a competency framework that goes beyond the individual competency
profile. This can be a serious fit model when it comes to matching individuals to positions in
organisations. Often these organisational competencies are not spelt out in job advertisements.
Instead, they are implied.
Organisations may require their new recruits to have specific competencies or qualities, such
as:
Previous experience essential
Technical knowledge
Knowledge Skills Attributes Competency
Knowledge
• General knowledge profile
• Organisational/industry knowledge
• Technical knowledge – subject matter expertise
Skills
• General skills – like communication
• Industry/discipline skills like plumbing or counselling
• Specialist skills – air conditioning plumber
Attributes
• General personality type – eg positive & outgoing
• Industry – strong supervisory/teaching inclination
• Enthusiastic, caring & results driven

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Specialist skills
More general skills
Personality traits.
Failing to adhere to stated policy and requirements can mean that the wrong person is selected;
for example:
Hiring a person with no experience of management or the industry for a
supervisor’s role.
Hiring someone with no patience or empathy for a caring role.
Hiring someone for a building role who has no experience, knowledge or
qualifications.
Managers should be aware of any policies and procedures in place that apply to the recruitment
process, but they and other staff may need to be informed of these. Where staff are unaware or
inexperienced, they should be referred for the appropriate training.
1.5 – Trial forms and documents supporting policies and procedures and make
necessary adjustments
Recruitment documents
Different electronic and physical documents may be used during the recruitment process, such
as:
Job adverts
Job descriptions
Application forms
Assessment papers
Score sheets.
Typically, there is a form that must be filled in for the purposes of documentation. Here is a
sample –

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Recruitment Advisory Form
Department………………………………………….. Date………../……../……….
Position Title/no…………………………………………………….
Status: Permanent Temporary Contract Part-time Full-time
Salary to be advertised…………………………………………………………………………………..
Salary cost centre……………………………………… Accounts
code………………………….
New Position…………………… Replacement …………………………………………………..
Authorisation to advertise from…………………………………………………………………….
Current salary range ………………………………………………………………………………………
Justification for filling the position
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………
Person[s] responsible
Advertisement…………………………………………………………………………………..
Organising applications……………………………………………………………………..
Short-list preparation…………………………………………………………………………
Interview arrangements…………………………………………………………………….
Choose selection panel……………………………………………………………………..
Referee checks………………………………………………………………………………….

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Licence checks [driving/police] …………………………………………………………
Process schedule
1. Position description ready and approved February
2. Selection of interview panel March
3. Review of job description and selection criteria late March
4. Choose advertisement methods April
5. Advertise late April
6. Close of applications 21 May
7. Short List 30 May
8. Undertake interviews and tests 2nd week of June
9. Prepare interview reports for selection 3rd week of June
10. Selection panel decisions 4th week of June
11. Referee & license checks 4th week of June
12. Candidate notification 1st week of July
13. Agreement on start date 2nd week of July
Internal documents of this kind vary from company to company but they all have a
standard format with respect to detail required.
Job description
The common practice in modern HR circles is to advertise two requirements –
Position description
Person description

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Within these two sets of information the standard process is to request that the candidates
present their experience and a personal attributes in a structured form known as selection
criteria.
Documents can be used to support the organisation’s policies and procedures, for example, by
gathering specific information, such as amount of experience, or an explanation of the
candidate’s skills and knowledge.
As needs change, the documents should be adapted and updated. Using specialised
documents is also useful, such as by having application forms specific to particular job roles.
Case Study: the receptionist position
In this case study the purpose is to indicate the basic format of the documentation that is faced
by candidates. Imagine that the position is for a receptionist in a large professional office of
doctors and allied health professionals.
Position Description
General:
This is a general office reception position within a busy health practice. It requires
communication, computer literacy and interpersonal skills. The position involves mixing with a
range of health professionals and patients needing attention. Attention to detail is important,
along with a positive attitude to helping people under stress. Qualifications are preferred.
Excellent development opportunities will be offered along with generous remuneration package.
Position Selection Criteria:
1.
Experience in frontline reception
2. Qualifications
3. Experience in health/service environment
4. Computer skills & training
5. Verbal communication skills/interpersonal skills
6. Time management and prioritisation
Person Selection Criteria:
1.
Positive approach to people

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2. Ability to handle pressure
3. Caring attitude
4. Team player
5. Flexible approach to work
6. Honesty and integrity
Close of applications:
All applications will close on 5th August. Applicants should enclose a copy of a current CV.
Applications can be made on-line. Referees will be required at a later point in the application
process. Written applications should be sent to GPO Box 111, Workland. Australia.
Contact person: Jane Wilson Tel 1300 986 123 E [email protected]

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2. RECRUIT AND SELECT STAFF

2.1. Determine future human resource needs in collaboration with relevant managers and
sections

 

2.2. Ensure current position descriptors and person specifications for vacancies are used by
managers and others involved in recruitment, selection and induction processes

 

2.3. Provide access to training and other forms of support to all persons involved in
recruitment and selection process

 

2.4. Ensure advertising of vacant positions complies with organisational policy and legal
requirements

2.5. Utilise specialists where necessary

2.6. Ensure selection procedures are in accordance with organisational policy and legal
requirements

2.7. Ensure processes for advising applicants of selection outcome are followed

2.8. Ensure job offers and contracts of employment are executed promptly, and new
appointments are provided with advice about salary, terms and conditions

 

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2.1 – Determine future human resource needs in collaboration with relevant
managers and sections
Planning for the future
Recruiting and selecting staff should be done with the company’s future in mind; there is no
point taking on staff with the idea of training them to be managers if the company is changing
hands, restructuring or closing down soon. Similarly, there is little point launching a large
recruitment drive if the company is planning on downsizing.
Case Study: ASIO and intergenerational challenges
The Australian Security and Intelligence Organisation [ASIO] is the federal government agency
responsible managing the protection of Australians from the danger of spies and terrorists.
Since the terrorist attacks on the USA Twin Towers in New York, the Bali bombings and other
international acts of terrorism, ASIO has undergone a major revamp including an extensive
growth program. This has led to a major recruitment drive and an expansion of staff. According
to Tom Hyland, International Editor of the Sunday Age, “ASIO is putting young, inexperienced
officers in senior jobs, as the domestic spy agency struggles to absorb an influx of recruits hired
in an unprecedented expansion of the organisation”. [Sunday Age 7/3/10].
ASIO has doubled its staff over the past six years with more than 50% having less than five
years experience. The training of intelligence officers takes time. They work in complex, secret
and ambiguous situations and settings. Of the 1600+ staff, Hyland estimates that only 300 have
more than ten years experience and a half have less than four years experience. Part of the
problem is the major advertising campaign that brought an influx of Generation X and Y
applicants. They came with different views of work, entitlement and opportunity and low levels of
intelligence work experience. In addition, they fit the profile of young people who will need time
to have and support families. Put another way, a lot of ASIO energy is being put into human
resource management; not a core business activity of the organisation. So, while the
recruitment campaign has been successful in attracting applicants, the campaign has also
brought in its fair share of problems. The vetting process for security clearances takes time and
this means positions can be left unfilled for long periods of time. Because ASIO is a public
service agency it also has obligations with respect to rules and procedures that apply to the
federal public service.
Learning Points
The ASIO story shows what happens when organisations need to expand rapidly. They have to
have an impact on the labour market, that is, attracting people who may be under demand from
other fields of employment. The search for a younger workforce brings it own issues.
Generations X and Y have known views of their lifestyles and employment. Because of public
service rules, even secret organisations have to comply with whole of government principles
and regulations. In small organisations, the focus of recruitment is more likely to be on
individuals. Intakes of groups of people require considerable human resource management
interventions. ASIO is currently juggling its core business with human resource development
issues. This is occurring at time when the Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, has advised that the
Australia is more at risk of a terrorist threat than ever before.
This example shows how the previous recruitment drive was executed without properly
considering the organisation’s future needs and operation.

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2.2 – Ensure current position descriptors and person specifications for vacancies
are used by managers and others involved in recruitment, selection and induction
processes
Matching people and positions
Matching people with positions requires a great deal of thought and consideration. Everyone
involved with recruitment and selection needs to understand what the organisation is looking for
and ensure that this is acknowledged throughout the process. This can be achieved through the
use of up to date job descriptions and breakdowns of requirements and criteria.
Case Study: team suitability
Rapid is the name of a marine construction team that specialises in building and fitting out
submarine security systems. Now that the Australian federal government has decided to build
12 submarines onshore, Rapid is facing a major increase in its senior management team. The
company has advertised internationally for highly skilled engineers. The CEO has been advised
by the HR Group Manager to use the interpersonal relationship testing tool known as FIRO-B.
This tool was originally designed to select submarine crews so it has some internal validity
within the maritime industry. The HR manager suggests that the CEO looks on the internet for
more details on the FIRO-B instrument. He searches on
www.skillsone.com. He finds a sample
report that helps him to understand how the tool can assist with team selection. The CEO is not
worried about the technical skills of the applicants because they are likely to have Masters’
degrees with ample proof of their IQ and technical knowledge. Instead, he is wants to look at the
relational skills and the emotional awareness of the potential recruits. He noted that FIRO-B
measures three dimensions of the personality: inclusion / control / affection. For the company to
succeed, it is going to rely heavily on excellence in communications and relationships with
internal and external stakeholders. Before the applicants have been asked to undertake the test,
the CEO and the HR manager give some thought to the ideal profile. They want the new senior
managers to be open, caring and sensitive. High level people management skills will be
imperative. The HR Manager provided the following graphic to help the CEO look at possible
appointees for the 4 positions. He used the following rating system for the FIRO-B scores.

Attribute Weak Moderate Okay Very Good

 

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BSBHRM506 Learner Guide Version 5.1, February 2021 Page 24 of 43

 

Management
skills
Low Some skills Good skills Manages people
well
People skills No people skills Takes effort Has ability Good empathy
Self-awareness Too technical Will struggle May get
stressed
Very self aware
Self
management
Too risky Will need help Can manage
self
Very competent
Self-esteem Weak self image Solid self image Self confident Astute

 

Candidate Inclusion Control Affection
Steve Jones Weak Okay Moderate
Carlene Welch Very good Moderate Okay
Adam Schlitz Weak Weak Very good
Jansy Dax Okay Moderate Very good
Miriam Smith Okay Moderate Okay
Garry Lell Very good Moderate Okay
Jenny Cruz Very good Okay Very good
Reno Gachio Okay Okay Very good
Rjisdak Dramcoj Weak Very good Very good

Learning points
This case study highlights the potential of psychometric tools to assist in team and other types
of recruitment and selection. The example shows how the HR manager has become an
effective coach to the CEO. Engineers typically come from a technical background. They do not

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have much training in people or soft management skills. In senior management roles technical
skills are less important than people skills. Major new projects like the building of submarines
will involve complexity, ambiguity, conflict and uncertainty. These are psychological attributes,
not hard skills like mathematics, physics, metallurgy or stress analysis.
2.3 – Provide access to training and other forms of support to all persons
involved in recruitment and selection process
Training
Recruiting and selecting staff requires the people involved in every part of the process to be on
the same wavelength, understanding what the company wants and needs and hiring candidates
who can satisfy these criteria.
The personnel involved in the recruitment process should already be fairly competent and wellinformed about the company’s values and aims. Where staff are less sure, they should be
offered suitable training and / or support to enable them to do their jobs properly.
Training can be formal or informal and may be:
A short course
Training sessions
Meetings
Paper-based.
Where a need is identified, the staff member should be directed to the training that is available.

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2.4 – Ensure advertising of vacant positions complies with organisational policy
and legal requirements
Legal requirements
Recruitment and selection is subject to legislation and legal requirements, mostly concerned
with discrimination and equal opportunities. The specifics of these laws may vary from area to
area, so you should always check what is relevant in your area.
Discrimination and equal opportunities are generally concerned with:
Age
Gender
Sexual orientation
Political views
Disability
Race
Religion.
Discrimination is a matter of concern in all recruitment processes. There are state and federal
laws that apply to recruitment and advertising positions. The general principle is that any
information sought that can be a source of discrimination is not permitted. So gender, age and
ethnic background details cannot be sought. Police records can be assessed but only where the
activity is relevant to the position. Some applicants will supply these details as part of their case
for being selected. They are welcome to do so but they cannot be compelled to supply this
information.
Discrimination in this context is structural rather than personal. So a statement like ‘mature
women only’ is a code for indicating that young women who might need time off to have children
are not going to be considered. This is a breach of several discrimination laws. HR
professionals are trained to know these laws and should be consulted as part of the recruitment
process.

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2.5 – Utilise specialists where necessary
HR specialists and outside help
There is the facility available to hire specialists to recruit and select staff for your company. You
can get:
HR specialists to work with you to select appropriate candidates and make
recommendations
Agencies to select staff available for hire
Companies to design and launch your advertisement
Companies to handle the whole process.
Organisations may choose to utilise specialists:
Because they lack experienced enough staff to make the decision
They don’t have the time to advertise and select staff
Their staff requirements can be met easily through an agency, such as factory
workers.
If your company doesn’t already have a chosen specialist, you can generally find suitable
services through internet searches or local business directories.
Assessment Centres
Assessment centres offer significant support to the employer or organisation. An assessment
centre can dedicate an entire day or two conducting various selection techniques on candidates
including complex and time intensive techniques such as realistic job interviews and lateral
thinking exercises (workplace simulation), psychometric tests and practical demonstrations.
Potential candidates are observed by teams of assessors and facilitators and are evaluated on
performance and suitability for the job to be filled. With the enhanced focus on the selection
process and properly designed tests which are standardized, reliable and valid in predicting an
applicant’s future success and fit to the work situation and role, assessment centres are more
adept and effective in the selection process.
Outsourcing

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Outsourcing is the business practice of hiring a party outside a company to perform services
and create goods that traditionally were performed in-house by the company’s own employees
and staff. Usually done as a cost-cutting measure, it can affect jobs ranging from customer
support to manufacturing to the back office.
Use of specialist psychometric skills assessments
These assessments provide expert advice and manage tests, saves time and hassle with the
administration of tests, provide quick results and provide benchmarking results and
comprehensive result reports
2.6 – Ensure selection procedures are in accordance with organisational policy
and legal requirements
Adhering to the law
Please refer back to section 2.4 of this Learner Guide for information on anti-discrimination
legislation.
Selection
The process of selection is the decision-making component of the recruitment process; once the
recruitment plan has been implemented, applications begin to arrive and they then need to be
sorted and prioritised. Once the priority order has been established then the shortlist needs to
be formed. Selection sounds simple but it is not; recruitment attracts the applications, while the
assessment step of selection weeds out the eligible from the ineligible applicants.
The selection process has steps. The most important thing to remember is that the selection
process is front-ended by the design of the selection criteria. Without selection criteria there is
no platform for rationally assessing applications. The selection criteria provide a quick test of
validity and priority. They help to sort out the ‘tyre kickers’ from the genuine applicants.
There are essentially four steps in the selection process: reception of the applications, sorting of
the applications and interview of the candidates and selection of the final candidate. The
diagram below outlines the four steps –

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The selection process phases
In the first phase of selection the applications are received. They need to be sorted into arrival
and acceptance times. On time arrivals have greater validity than late arrivals. This involves the
application of the principle of fairness. Late arrivals signal that the candidate does not share the
views and values of the recruiter about time management principles. Late applications do not
show an underlying respect for the time-frames of the recruiter. Obviously there are exceptions,
but they need to be assessed in the reception phase of the process. Some leniency may be
allowed for applications into senior roles. In public sector organisations there can be hard and
fast rules about this issue of being ‘on time’.
The sorting phase is a matter of checking and matching against selection criteria. The selection
criteria provides an analytical framework. If there are five selection criteria then the sorter of the
applications will need to find evidence of compliance against all five criteria. Some organisations
use an internal check-listing template to work out who is compliant and who is not. Many
organisations have a simple classification process of suitable / potential / not suitable. This
arrangement quickly sorts out the issue of the ineligible worker who has not addressed the
selection criteria. In this phase ‘Return on Investment’ is crucial. No-one in an organisation

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wants to waste time on masses of irrelevant applications. Once the test of the selection criteria
has been addressed, then the recruiter can consider such facts as appeal and compliance
evident within application forms.
Some companies and organisations control the situation with a template as an outline of
compliance. An example is shown below –

Compliance Applicant 1 Applicant 2 Applicant 3
Criteria # 1 High Low High
Criteria # 2 Low Medium High
Criteria # 4 Medium Medium Medium
Criteria # 5 High Low Low

Some form of sorting by a rational model of logic is essential. The key issue is to sort out who
will be interviewed, who might be interviewed and who won’t be interviewed. Most organisations
complain about being overwhelmed by applications; this occurs most often when unemployment
rates are high and applicants are desperate to obtain jobs.
Government policy is another factor that needs to be considered, as some government policies
require unemployed people to provide evidence that they have tried to apply for jobs. In some
situations this is plausible. In other situations it is simply brutal and psychologically destructive
to all parties involved. For example, consider the physically and emotionally disabled person
who applies for a job for which they are not capable of meeting the needs of the position. All
they want is a rejection letter. How does this help the applicant? How does this help the
employer? It does, however, meet a government agency standard of proof that a disabled
person has applied for a job.
Once the short list of potential interviewees has been determined, there is the administration
task of arranging the logistics of the interviews. This is not a complicated task and it can be
delegated to administrative staff.
More important is the challenge of selecting the interview panel. Whose interests should be
represented on the interview panel? How directly are they involved in managing the new
recruit? Often the selection panel has some influence on the short-listing process. Much

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depends on the policies and the protocols of the company or the organisation making the
decision. Direct links between managers and employees is critical.
In some situations, the interview may not be face to face. Interviews over the telephone present
a challenge that needs to be considered as part of recruitment planning. In some instances the
interview may include a 3
rd party who can act as the organisation’s agent in an international
setting. Some industries, like IT and finance, now rely on global recruiting, so they have begun
to finesse the skills associated with remote location interviews and selection.
Case Study: selection
The team at the Cancer Institute social work department has a strong culture of collaboration,
client focus and problem solving. They are short of two staff. A new HR director has been
appointed from the commercial sector with a strong track record of cost savings and budget
efficiency. The HR director and the Social Work director meet in order to talk about the new
positions. The HR director suggests that on a panel of four there is no need for three social
workers to be involved. The Director of Social Work disagrees. The social work team of 22 staff
really needs to make sure any new person fits the established team structures. This means the
director wants to plan the whole team capability. The three other staff will cover supervision,
specialisation and peer support interests. Each of these is a particular area of service in social
work practice. The new HR director thinks the issue through. She decides that there is no real
need for an HR person on the interview panel. The Social Work Department should do their own
interviewing and advise HR who, in turn, can explain to the successful applicant the policies and
procedures of the cancer institute. This saves HR time and uses the specialist knowledge of the
social workers who have many of the essential interviewing skills. In the selection process it
became an issue of using appropriate skills and not duplicating resources in the selection
process.
Learning Points
This case study is a simple example of working out who is best to do the interviews. Subject
matter experts are usually best to pick their peers. Much depends on the organisational culture
and the need to fit the specialists to the culture. Organisational cultures can become precious at
the expense of the specialists. Put bluntly, surgeons are surgeons whatever hospital they work
in.

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The key things to remember about any selection process are that they must be transparent, fair
and evidence based. Selection procedures and processes can be challenged under a range of
legislative provisions including fair trading laws.
Targeted and behavioural interviewing procedures provide the employer and the recruiter with
mechanisms for getting evidence of relevant experience without discriminating against the
applicant. Again, the test is evidence. Whatever interview issues need to be resolved, the
interviewer is entitled to ask for evidence of similar situations in which the interviewee has
worked and proven their skills.
Interviewees have appeal rights. These are not simply in-house company rules. Legislation
applies. For instance, an employer can be challenged under Trade Practices and Fair-Trading
laws. Interviewers can be held liable under such laws.

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2.7 – Ensure processes for advising applicants of selection outcome are followed
Notification of results
It is courteous and more professional to notify all applicants of the results of the selection
process, regardless of the stage they achieved. This may be in the form of a letter, a call back
or an email.
There is another consideration for managers of the interview process. While it may be easy to
choose the short list, time should be given to the people who do not succeed in the application
process. Job applications can be a major self-esteem challenge for some people. If they need
and request feedback then they are entitled to do so. This means that the recruitment process
has an end-process. Applicants have a right to genuine feedback. In fact, apt feedback can be
really helpful.
Where your organisation offers or assures a response, you should ensure that this is followed
up, even if it is just a mass email thanking the applicant for their time and application.

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2.8 – Ensure job offers and contracts of employment are executed promptly, and
new appointments are provided with advice about salary, terms and conditions
Supporting new recruits
When the successful candidate is selected, they should be given a job offer. If they accept the
position and its conditions, then they should be given a contract of employment.
Contracts of employment should contain all of the information about the role, including duties,
hours to be worked, holiday entitlement and salary details. This should be signed by the recruit
and a copy kept by the new worker and the HR office. Ideally, this should be done before the
person begins work, or as soon as possible thereafter.
Employment contracts set out the rights and obligations of both the employer and the employee.
It protects the job security of the employee and protects the employer from certain risks, for
example the release of confidential employer information after the term of employment ends.
During training and induction, the new employee should have the terms and conditions of their
employment and their role explained to them, to enable them to work compliantly and
effectively.
The time frames and the order in which these actions are implemented will vary from
organisation to organisation; you will be made aware of this in your training, to enable you to
follow the correct procedures.
All given time frames should be adhered to; a manager or supervisor should be on hand to
oversee the process and ensure deadlines and targets are met. Missing deadlines and following
lax timeframes can damage the applicant’s perception of the company.
After this process has been followed, the new recruit should be informed of who they can
contact to ask questions or discuss any issues.

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3. MANAGE STAFF INDUCTION
3.1.
Provide access to training and ongoing support for all persons engaged in staff induction
3.2. Check induction processes are followed across the organisation

3.3. Oversee management of probationary employees and provide them with feedback until
their employment is confirmed or terminated

 

3.4. Obtain feedback from participants and relevant managers on extent induction process is
meeting its objectives

3.5. Make refinements to induction policies and procedures
3.1 – Provide access to training and ongoing support for all persons engaged in
staff induction
Staff induction
Inducting staff initially involves explaining and clarifying the details of their employment, as
explained in section 2.8 of this Learner Guide. When this has been done, then staff should be
given all of the appropriate training that they need to begin their duties.
Staff should be directed to their training and it should ideally be recorded in a staff training
record; this is useful to ensure that training is up to date and has been completed as required.
Staff should not be expected to begin their roles without having completed their training
successfully.
While staff are training and beginning their new jobs, they should be given access to ongoing
support; this may range from recapping training sessions to emotional support. Being able to
talk to someone about their issues or concerns can greatly help new beginners at a company.

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3.2 – Check induction processes are followed across the organisation
Induction
Once the successful candidate has been chosen then they need to be inducted to the
organisation where they plan to work. Induction is a critical process of orientation,
encouragement, acceptance and validation. Organisations ignore this process at their peril!
It is rather annoying after all of the costs of the recruitment process to find that the new
candidate is poorly inducted and then leaves prematurely. Who pays the cost?
Induction is like adoption into a new family. There are issues of context, rules and protocols.
Induction is a process of introduction. If it is managed successfully, then it becomes a process
of winning support and building loyalty.
Different organisations have different models of induction. Some are proactive, some are
reactive.
The process model of recruitment
The best method of induction is a process model. One model has been outlined below. There
are others. The key points of induction are –
Create a positive attitude for new appointee
Recruitment
application
interview
selection
induction

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Build a positive attitude to the new organisation
Provide encouraging new experiences
Introduce new people
Reduce anxiety levels
Develop new working relationships
Set standards for new relationships
Win business or organisational loyalty
Induction can be complicated by legal processes. For example, the use of a probationary period
for a new worker can be an issue for both parties; if the new worker does not like the new job
then they have the freedom to turn down the position during the probation period. The cost of
turnover of a worker is high. Different estimates range between 20- and 40% of their base
salary. With Generation X and Y employees now showing a strong presence in the labour
market in Australia, many of the basic rules of employment are being challenged. Loyalty is one
precept that has been discarded by many new generation workers, whereas it still exists in the
minds of many baby boomers.
Case Study: welcome
Joan has been accepted for a new job with Jones P/L. She is the new engineering manager and
she is the first female in this role. From the day she arrived at the company, she has been
nurtured by the senior management team. The HR director was a critical influence. Everyone
appreciated the role and the new person. They had a plan to build her in to their world, but on
her terms. There were lots of discussions – informal and formal. She found that many of the
attitudes were based on lack of information. Induction for Joan was about discussion with lots of
people about her issues, concerns and fears. Everyone was really supportive. The process was
more important than the facts. Joan felt wanted and accepted. She was. She wanted to bring in
new professionals to the company. And she did. Induction became a source of engagement and
acceptance. She liked the company and its values.
Learning Points
Induction is an opportunity to win the loyalty and support of new staff. Handled properly, it is a
powerful process of engagement, acceptance and approval. To be successful, induction needs

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to be genuinely aligned to organisational values and principles. Otherwise, the inductee will
sense the cognitive dissonance.
3.3 – Oversee management of probationary employees and provide them with
feedback until their employment is confirmed or terminated
3.4 – Obtain feedback from participants and relevant managers on extent
induction process is meeting its objectives
Feedback
Feedback in the induction process works both ways; organisations should give recruits
feedback on their progress and recruits can give feedback on their induction experience; both
parties will receive constructive criticism this way.
Employees working a probationary period should be provided with feedback at the end of their
trial, whether or not they have been successful or not:
Successful:
What they were good at
What could / should be improved
How to improve their areas of weakness
Next steps
Overall summary.
Not successful:
Why they were unsuccessful
What they could improve
What the successful candidate(s) did differently
Whether they will be kept on file for future roles and whether they can reapply in
the future.

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Candidates can be asked for feedback on their experiences during and after their inductions:
During:
How it’s going
What they would like to see / cover
After:
What was good?
What did they like?
What was bad?
What didn’t they like?
What could be better?
Gathering feedback
Feedback can be gathered and given verbally or on paper:
Verbally:
Group feedback session
One-on-one feedback session
General comments
Interview.
Paper:
Score sheet
Written observations and comments
Letter / email.

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3.5 – Make refinements to induction policies and procedures
Improve the induction process
Gathering feedback is done to help the organisation identify areas that may need attention and /
or improvement. Where problems are identified, the organisation can take relevant action to
ensure that the same problem does not occur in the future and to improve the process for future
employees.
The following case study shows what can happen when a problem is identified with induction
and probation.
Case Study: probation gone wrong
Seph is a highly skilled business analyst and accountant. He has extensive finance experience
in the City of London markets. He was an attractive recruit to the big four banks in Australia.
Seph and his wife wanted to move to Australia for a couple of years, so they could visit the
country and its tourist venues. His wife was an organisational change specialist. One of the
Australian banks decided to head-hunt Seph. He was open to the offer. There were several
telephone interviews and discussions. He decided that he would initially locate in Sydney.
Arrangements were made about salary and relocation costs. Seph asked if the bank had a job
for his wife, but hey said no. It was their HR policy to avoid husband and wife teams; apparently,
the logic of the argument was that if two people left, then it would cause more harm and cost to
the bank than the departure of one person. Seph accepted the policy but did not agree with the
logic of it. Seph found his first couple of months in the job stressful. He was the most senior
member of the analyst group by way of experience; the others did not have his overseas
experience and wisdom. He felt they were jealous that he could contact clients and advisers
from around the world. His wife had got a really good job as the national training consultant for a
major global company. Oddly enough she actually had to run some training assignments for the
management in the bank where Seph was working. Two weeks before the probation period was
due to end Seph decided to leave. He told the HR manager in an exit interview that too little
effort had been made to make him feel welcome. He said that next time they recruit talent from
overseas they should sort out this issue of petty internal jealousy. Seph got a job almost
immediately with a major finance company that had global links and valued his European
expertise.
Learning Points

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Induction is a very influential and complex process that raises particular issues for recruits from
overseas. This case study shows how unpleasant an insular organisational culture can be in the
eyes of new recruits. Probation gave Seph an exit strategy at the cost of the company. From an
outsider’s point of view this company had some big issues with its whole view of the value of
workers. Even the policy about employing a wife and husband did not make much sense, with
respect to attracting overseas talent. The best HR feature about this company was its exit
interview tool. Sadly, the company could expect to get a bad reputation in the marketplace for
this sort of experience.

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REFERENCES
These suggested references are for further reading and do not necessarily represent the
contents of this Learner Guide
Internet
www.impactpublications.com – information on hiring difficult people
www.jcu.edu.au – this site offers a university’s policies framework
www.civilservicecommissioners.org – offers ideas about the UK civil service processes
www.aspc.gov.au – information on the Australian public service commission processes
www.interdependent.com.au – how to plan an induction program
www.onlineinduction.com – this site offers an online demonstration program
www.cdu.ed.au – this shows you a university orientation process
www.transformmybusiness.com.au – this offers a 39 page free induction manual
Books
Baker, S. & K. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Project Management. Alpha Books. New York.
1998.
Jones, R., HRM Fundamentals [2nd ed.] Pearson Education Australia. French’s Forest. 2009.
Nankervis,A., Compton R., & Baird, M. Human Resource Management; Strategies and
Processes [6th Ed.]. Cengage Learning. South Melbourne.2008.
Stone,R.J., Managing Human Resources.Wiley. Brisbane. 2008.
Tovey, M., & Uren,M., Managing Performance Improvement. Pearson Education Australia.
Melbourne. 2006.
Wilson,J.P. [ed.], Human Resource Development. Kogan Page. London. 2001

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